Washington University Researchers Demonstrate SQ1274's Efficacy in Animal Models of Ovarian and Uterine Cancer

Washington University Researchers Demonstrate SQ1274's Efficacy in Animal Models of Ovarian and Uterine Cancer

Washington University researchers led by Dr. Katherine C. Fuh recently examined the potential of Sequoia’s lead compound SQ1274 in the arsenal against ovarian and uterine cancer. Current treatment for these cancers is surgical removal of tumors, followed by chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel. Unfortunately, survival rates are low, due in part to resistance developed to paclitaxel. The group compared SQ1274 to paclitaxel and found that SQ1274 was more active against ovarian and uterine cancer cell lines, and that SQ1274 decreases expression of AXL, a protein contributing to paclitaxel resistance. Finally, they demonstrated that SQ1274 inhibited tumor growth more effectively in two mouse models. The authors conclude that “this study supports the development of SQ1274 as a chemotherapeutic to treat ovarian and uterine cancer.”

Sequoia's optimized anticancer compound published in Journal of Medicinal Chemistry

Scientists at Sequoia and AMRI worked together to optimize bifidenone, Sequoia’s plant-derived anticancer compound. The resulting compound has promising antitumor activity in mice, and is significantly more potent than paclitaxel against taxane-resistant cell lines in vitro.

Sequoia announces Fast Track Status granted by FDA

Sequoia announces Fast Track Status granted by FDA

"Many of my patients with multidrug-resistant recurrent urinary tract infections have tried multiple antibiotics for years without success," said Liz D'Antonio, CRNP, director of clinical research, Anne Arundel Urology. " A vaccine presents a new approach that could offer new hope for these patients. We eagerly await the results of the next studies as it hopefully moves toward approval."

Nature: Vaccines promoted as key to stamping out drug-resistant microbes

Nature:  Vaccines promoted as key to stamping out drug-resistant microbes

"While the search for new antibiotics continues, several studies have highlighted that vaccines also have benefits against AMR. By reducing cases of disease, they slow the rise of drug-resistant pathogens, because the microbes have fewer opportunities to multiply and evolve."